Jackson Municipal Income Tax

Residents in the City of Jackson will be deciding whether or not they want to support a proposed income tax. Jackson is one of only two cities in the state of Ohio without an income tax.

Voters in Jackson County will have to decide the fate of some levies on the ballot next week.

Below is a summary of what levy funds would go toward if passed. The Jackson County Auditor’s Office provided the costs and estimated revenue of each levy.

Jackson County:

Voters across Jackson County will have to decide if they want to support a replacement levy that is geared toward Jackson County EMS.

The levy is for the purpose of providing ambulance service, emergency medical services, or both.

The EMS levy is a replacement for 1.5 mills for 5 years. It would produce an estimated $945,347.06 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $52.50 per year.

Oak Hill and Madison/Jefferson Townships:

Residents in the Village of Oak Hill, Madison, and Jefferson Townships will be voting on a renewal levy for the benefit of Madison/Jefferson Joint Fire District.

The levy is for the purpose of fire protection and emergency medical services.

The fire levy is a renewal for 1 mill for 5 years. It would produce an estimated $104,875.63 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $28.98 per year.

Milton Township:

Voters in Milton Township will be voting on a levy for cemeteries. The levy is a renewal for 1 mill for 5 years.

The levy is for the purpose of maintaining and operating cemeteries. It would produce an estimated $26,740.85 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $26.00 per year.

Liberty Township:

Residents in Liberty Township will need to decide if they want to keep helping out their fire department.

The levy is a replacement for 1 mill for 5 years. It is for the purpose of fire protection.

The fire levy would produce an estimated $35,496.60 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $35.00 per year.

Hamilton Township:

Voters in Hamilton Township will be voting on a replacement fire levy for 1.5 mills for 5 years. It would produce an estimated $14,767.32 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $52.50 per year.

Franklin Township:

Voters in Franklin Township will be voting on a replacement levy for fire protection for 1 mill for 5 years. It would produce an estimated $54,738.47 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $35.00 per year.

Village of Coalton:

In the spring, voters in the Village of Coalton voted down two levies, which are appearing on the ballot once more this fall.

The levies, which are renewals, that are up for a vote pertains to maintaining and operating the cemeteries and upkeep of parks and recreation in the village.

Coalton Mayor Kim Milliken explained that if the levies pass once again, it would provide additional revenue to help Coalton maintain and operate both the cemeteries and parks (ball field, village green, etc). The funds would also be used for paying for fuel for mowing.

Coalton Cemeteries:

The levy for operating and maintaining the village cemeteries is a renewal for 2 mills for 5 years. The Cemetery levy would produce an estimated $7,022.06 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $69.95 per year.

Coalton Parks and Recreation:

The levy for parks and recreation is a renewal for 1.75 mills for 5 years. The parks and recreation levy would produce an estimated $6,144.30 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $61.21 per year.

Bloomfield Township:

Voters in Bloomfield Township will be voting on a replacement fire levy for 2 mills for 5 years. It would produce an estimated $63,526.24 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $70.00 per year.

City of Jackson:

Voters in the City of Jackson will be deciding on a renewal cemetery levy and the fate of a municipal income tax.

Jackson Cemetery:

The levy is to maintain and operate Fairmount Cemetery. It is a renewal for 1.5 mills for 5 years. The levy would produce an estimated $201,576.99 per year. The owner of a $100,000 home would pay $48.13 per year.

Jackson Municipal Income Tax:

Residents in the City of Jackson will be deciding whether or not they want to support a proposed income tax. Jackson is one of only two cities in the state of Ohio without an income tax.

The money from the tax would be used for the purposes of street and sidewalk repairs and/or replacement, and for maintenance or construction of other city infrastructure, the demolition of unsafe buildings, and general operations and services of the City of Jackson, including the police department.

The tax is 1.5 percent on income for 5 years. It is estimated to generate $2.2 million in revenue per year. Retirement income is exempt. Also exempt is social security, military pay, child support, and unemployment benefits.

There will be a credit of one percent given to Jackson residents who work and pay income tax in another city.

Jackson Mayor Randy Evans recently released that his office handed out advanced layoff notices to 16 city employees, nine of whom were in the police department. Those individuals will be laid off in November unless the income tax passes.

Evans has previously explained that two years ago he spoke out at the city council, before being mayor, that before he would support an income tax, he expected to see cuts in spending and cuts to utility rates.

Since that time, according to Evans, the city electric rates have been cut by 13 percent to residential customers; automatic annual three percent rate increases have been removed from water and sewer rate; city employment has been reduced by 15 positions through attrition, and spending cut has been made in every city department budget.

Evans said that the above-mentioned actions show that his administration is serious about spending tax dollars wisely. He explained that these cuts do no solve the lack of revenue in the general fund.

“The fact that the state of Ohio will no longer allow utility revenues to subsidize the general fund provides for the electric rate cuts, but causes serious deficits in the general fund,” explained Evans. “General fund services are mostly police, parks, streets, and buildings.”

Evans said, “Yes, I do now support the income tax. Yes, the city has made the changes needed. Yes, the city needs this tax revenue to provide adequate general fund services of police, parks, streets, and buildings. The income tax revenue is needed to keep our town safe. The income tax revenue is needed to fix-up, clean-up, and return pride to our hometown.”

A majority “yes” vote is necessary for the passage of all of these levies, and tax.

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